Proposal Descriptions and Guidelines

Now accepting proposals though March 31st for our 2021 event.

Open a downloadable copy of the 2021 proposal submission guidelines or view them below.

Individual papers, panels, workshops accepted through March 31

Posters accepted on a rolling basis through May

Workshops

Professional Development Workshops differ from symposia and panels in having a formal educational or professional development component that involves clear goals and learning outcomes as well as appropriate teaching methods. Content may include presentations, discussions, exercises, formal training, assigned pre-conference readings, or other methods of promoting heuristic goals. In 2021, workshops will be 1-3 hours and available to any conference registrant.

Posters

Poster presentations are designed for the presentation of research or pedagogical or program innovations in a less formal and more interactive way than a formal panel. Effective posters focus on the main points of the research (the question, key findings, basic methodology); the main value of the session is the dialog between presenter and session attendees. In the virtual setting, there will be opportunities for attendees to interact with presenters during designated time periods.

Panel

presentation panel proposal must have a partial (at least 2) or full set (3-4) of participants. We particularly encourage sessions that include multiple disciplines, professions, and perspectives.  Presentation panels are designed for presentation of research or other scholarly AESS-related endeavors. When filled, they consist of 3-4 presenters. Panel presentations will be pre-recorded and uploaded to the virtual event platform 2 weeks prior to the event. During the conference, the session will be for live Q&A and discussion. Panels will organize if they wish to create a longer cohesive upload video or have individual presentations uploaded. More details will be provided to accepted panels.

Individual

An individual paper proposal is appropriate for those wishing to share the results of research or pedagogical or program innovations. Presentations will be grouped into themed panels by the Program Chair and assigned a session moderator. Individual presentations will be pre-recorded and uploaded to the virtual event platform. During the conference, the session will be for live Q&A with the 3-4 panelists. See also Areas of Emphasis.

Discussion Symposia

Discussion symposia are designed for focused discussion on important questions of interest to the AESS membership.  Playing off the original ancient Greek symposia, the emphasis is on in-depth intellectual exchange. Opening remarks are appropriate but it is not expected that participants will deliver a formal presentation. Discussion symposia are 1 hour in length, and will take place on Mon-Thurs in parallel with presentation panels and other sessions.  Discussion symposia consist of up to 4 participants and must be fully organized in advance. In only rare cases will the Program Committee add a member to a symposium.

Areas of Emphasis for 2021

In addition to general submissions for the 2021 event, AESS is seeking presentations that specifically relate to several areas of emphasis. When submitting a proposal, select the area of emphasis, if applicable.

Does your work seek to integrate disciplines in new and interesting ways? Do you bridge the social and natural sciences, art and science, or a range of disciplines in your teaching, research, or work in the community?  Does your work emphasize the ways disciplines integrate to solve complex problems? Are you seeking to be more intentional in the way you integrate disciplines? Are you driven by the goal of communicating to other disciplines? Then ESS Interdisciplinary Integration may be the theme for you!

Leader: Kat Owens

Effective communication is an increasingly valued job skill and life skill.  Whether you work in the public sector, academia, an NGO, a small, medium or large business, or any other kind of organization, you need to be able to communicate social and environmental issues effectively.  Translating, interpreting, and communicating environmental research and knowledge is a critical part of creating change in political, community and personal spheres. Communication is a vital consideration whether your aim is to educate, to influence, or to affect different audiences.  Thinking about how to communicate your environmental knowledge and values also provides an opportunity to critically reflect on your own assumptions, approaches and perspectives on the pressing environmental and social challenges of our time. Whether you teach environmental communication, research the creation and use of environmental messages, or create different modes of communication, we encourage you to share your experience at the conference.

Leader: Laureen Elgert

How do governments, communities, businesses, organizations and individuals deal with three concurrent global crises: the climate emergency, economic recession, and inequality, inequity and disproportionate impacts? There is both urgency and opportunity. The Solve Climate by 2030 project https://www.solveclimateby2030.org/ features a #GlobalClimateDialog that includes 100 webinars around the world in mid-April 2021 and a campaign to #MakeClimateAClass. In 2022, the project plans to engage thousands of universities, colleges and high schools in a global teach-in that will focus the world on climate solutions.  Share ideas on how you, your colleagues and your community are educating students on a Green Recovery, Solving Climate Change and a Just Transition.

Leaders: Eban Goodstein and David Blockstein

Environmental issues are high priority for people of color, yet people of color continue to be underrepresented in the environmental workforce. Surveys show that people of color make up 16% of the staff of environmental and conservation organizations in the U.S. and 20% of the staff of the top 40 environmental NGOs. People of color are also woefully underrepresented in the faculty of environmental studies. Lack of diversity in the environmental field makes it difficult for talented people of color and minorities to contribute at the detriment of the field as a whole. How do we make environmental education accessible and appealing to underrepresented populations? How do we change or reframe the environmental studies curriculum to address the concerns of those most vulnerable to environmental impacts? How do we transform environmental organizations and departments to be more inclusive and equitable? How do we support people of color and women scholars, educators, activists and practitioners to become leaders in their fields? This track welcomes presentations in 

  • Incorporating environmental justice in the curriculum 
  • Diversity, equity, and inclusion in environmental studies 
  • Institutional best practices for diversity, equity, and inclusion 
  • Reducing barriers for people of color, women, and other minorities

Leaders: Tony Rosenbaum and Clara Fang

The AESS Professional Development Committee is currently developing a new mentoring program, and we need your participation! We welcome proposals that contribute to our understanding of how to best design mentoring relationships to advance careers, the ESS field, and environmental causes. We will also provide opportunities for potential program participants to learn more about our new program, provide input into its design and function, and meet potential “matches” during interactive networking sessions.

Leader: Susan Caplow

Food systems sit at the intersection of research, practice, and everyday life, and as such, provide a lens through which to explore all aspects of sustainability: individual health and nutrition; community wellbeing; supply chain and labor practices; animal welfare; access, sovereignty, and justice; culturally appropriate foods and identity; ethical eating and consumerism; activism; land health; fair trade; climate change; policy and local governance; land use and planning; waste; transportation; global trade; hunger; and more. Indeed, untangling the interrelated and nested implications of the ways we grow, process, distribute, consume, and dispose of food is a wicked problem, at the heart of which lies values about the ways we care about place, community, and the natural world. Please identify your presentation or panel if it connects with any of these ideas. Join us in exploring the myriad ways we understand, engage, and participate in the food system. Storytelling, research, case studies, pedagogy, art exhibits, recipes, and ideas for action are all invited.

Leader: Lissy Goralnik

Conference Proposal Guidelines

General note for all submissions

Abstracts should describe the research or innovation concisely and be written for a broad, multidisciplinary audience. Please keep technical language to a minimum

Individual Presentations

Abstracts should be 300 words (2000 characters) or less and include a:

  • Brief overview of the topic background
  • Specification of content type (e.g. empirical research results, theoretical contribution, project description, pedagogical experiment, presentation of artistic work, personal or institutional experience, etc.)
  • Statement of content, including presentation purpose
    • Provide sufficient information that we can judge the quality of your proposal and its relevance to the conference audience
    • For example, research results might include focal question, method, results and conclusion; pedagogical experiment might include description of experiment, outcomes and lessons learned; presentation of artistic work might include creation of the work, presentation to the public and potential impact; etc.

Deadline for submission: March 31, 2021

Posters

Abstracts should be 300 words (2000 characters) or less and include a:

  • Brief overview of the topic background
  • Specification of content type (e.g. empirical research results, theoretical contribution, project description, pedagogical experiment, presentation of artistic work, personal or institutional experience, etc.)
  • Statement of content, including presentation purpose
    • Provide sufficient information that we can judge the quality of your proposal and its relevance to the conference audience
    • For example, research results might include focal question, method, results and conclusion; pedagogical experiment might include description of experiment, outcomes and lessons learned; presentation of artistic work might include creation of the work, presentation to the public and potential impact; etc.

Deadline for submission: Rolling through May

Full Panel Sessions

A proposal for a full panel session should be a summary abstract which gives a brief description and justification of the session in 300 words or less (2000 characters)  in the text box. This might include applicability to the conference theme, contribution to your field, connection to the mission and goals of AESS and the broader environmental studies and sciences community, and/or scholarly and professional merit.

In the “additional abstracts” text box, please include an abstract (with presentation title and author) of no more than 300 words (2000 characters) for each confirmed presentation; please see instructions for individual presentation abstracts above for more details.

 

Deadline for submission: March 31, 2021

Discussion Symposia

A proposal for a discussion symposium should be an abstract  which gives a brief description, including how the session will be structured, and justification of the session, in 300 words or less (2000 characters). This might include applicability to the conference theme, contribution to your field, connection to the mission and goals of AESS and the broader environmental studies and sciences community, and/or scholarly and professional merit.

The abstract for a discussion symposium need not include individual abstracts or biographies for each discussant but should include names, affiliations and email for each discussant. List these as co-presenters.

Deadline for submission: March 31, 2021

Workshops

Proposals should contain sufficient detail to justify the length of time participants will commit to this session. We expect leaders of accepted workshops to actively promote their sessions in advance of the registration deadline. The proposal should cover (in 700 words or fewer) the items below.

  1. Workshop title
  2. Length (1-3 hours)
  3. Proposed theme and justification
  4. An outline of goals and learning outcomes, and, if appropriate, plans for communication of results
  5. An outline of the progression of topics and types of learning activities or teaching methods
  6. A list of confirmed leaders and a sentence or two about their qualifications and proposed role  (you may also list these names under the co-presenter option)
  7. Description of target audience for workshop and methods leaders will use for recruitment of participants, beyond the AESS listserv

NOTE 1 : Workshops will be offered Monday through Thursday of the conference and require attendees to select their intent to attend during online registration. Workshop facilitators will receive a roster for their session and can request one from events@aessonline.org at anytime. We ask all workshop leaders to register by the conference’s early registration deadline or the workshop may be canceled.

 

Deadline for submission: March 31, 2021

The following workshop topics were suggestions gleaned from a survey to the AESS community at-large. We encourage potential submitters to review for proposal ideas for 2021. Click each category for suggested details.

Administration

Ideas include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • student scholarships/funding
  • program management
  • effective social media strategies
  • engaging alumni/donors
  • anti-coporatization
  • program design
  • sustainability programs
  • faculty to admin transition

Advancement

Ideas include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • T&P standards, strategies, and planning
  • challenges of interdisciplinarity for T&P
  • academic freedom
  • non-academic careers
  • post-tenure engagement (especially admin)

Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

Ideas include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • decolonizing / diversifying syllabi
  • AESS membership
  • anti-racism work
  • hiring
  • bias training
  • classes, searches, retention, promotion
  • teaching to 1st gen

Partnership

Ideas include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • community engagement
  • town / gown
  • citizen science
  • networking
  • cross-campus collaborations

Curriculum and Pedagogy

Ideas include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • innovation/high impact
    • project-based learning
    • active learning models
    • field based classes
    • online/hybrid formats
  • STEM
  • methods
  • psycho-social resilience
  • teaching hope
  • difficult discussion
  • neurodiversity/anxiety
  • research-teaching nexus
  • syllabus writing
  • ESS learning outcomes
  • campus sustainability
  • campus activism

Professional Development

Ideas include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • leading edge information
  • job market skills
  • citizenship beyond profession

Publishing

Ideas include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • publishing with students (undergrad)
  • book publication
  • co-authorship guidance

Research

Ideas include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • interdisciplinary research teams